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Hi, I’m Brad Feld, a managing director at the Foundry Group who lives in Boulder, Colorado. I invest in software and Internet companies around the US, run marathons and read a lot.

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Decluttering My Computer Network

Comments (16)

A few days ago, Amy and I came up to our  house in Keystone. We haven’t been here for about two months; we’ll be here through the end of the first week of January.

The first few hours were predictable. We “turned” everything on. We unpacked the car. We got settled in.

And I got frustrated. The Internet was slow. The Sonos wasn’t working correctly. Everything was trying to update itself. It was like a giant machine was trying to boot up, but was stuck in an initialization loop.

I wandered around the house tweaking things. One by one I got things working. As I reset things, I kept thinking to myself “I wonder why we need that.”

We bought this house in 2006. The network infrastructure is a cumulative build since then – a NetGear router connected to the cable modem, Cisco WiFi access points on each floor, default Sonos configuration, a Cisco phone that isn’t used anymore acting as a wired network repeater, USB hubs with one device connected, power extension cords, cables, and a bunch of other crap. The last time I was up here I installed an Apple Airport Extreme (which needed an update) but I left everything in place.

I decided to rip it all out yesterday and replace it with the Apple Airport Extreme. The result is a giant box of crap.

For an hour or so I continued to be frustrated. Things were better, but still choppy. I’d set all the computers up to use Google’s public DNS server (the magic 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4) but the network performance was still choppy – fast, then slow, then fast, then slow. At some point I realized I hadn’t set the Airport Extreme to use Google’s public DNS and it was defaulting everything to Comcast.

I made the switch. Boom – everything was fast again. As expected. Pandora played all day long without dropping. Video and audio calls were fine again.

As I looked at the giant box of crap this morning, I thought about the idea of decluttering. We have all this gunk in our lives that just slow us down. Just like my network. As the year comes to an end, I’m going to keep decluttering, the physical and the virtual.

Software Beats Network In My Book

Comments (33)

Remember rock / paper / scissors?  It’s a beautiful kids game that unlike tic-tac-toe regularly results in a winner.  Paper always beats rock.  Rock always beats scissors.  Scissors always beats paper.  But what happens when you only have two – say “software” and “network”.

Whenever I’m at a Silicon Flatirons event, I always get into an argument with someone from the telecom world about “what the Internet is.”  Most of the time I try to listen patiently for about 30 seconds as the telecom person explains to me how without them there would be no Internet and the applications that exist are merely “traffic” on “their network.”  They then try to tell me crazy things like “no one will ever need more than 100 Mbps” and say snarky things like “who knows, maybe Google will spend more on their 1 Gbps buildout then they did on the 700 MHz spectrum.”  I try to remind them that when I was 13 someone told me “you’ll never need more than 48k of RAM” and then again when I was 18 someone told me “you’ll never need a hard drive bigger than 10MB".”  Oh, the things people say in the throws of competitive pressure.  Innovation?  Who needs innovation.  Let’s take a big helping of regulation instead.

As someone who has been involved in creating software in one form or another for the past 25 years, I know I’m biased.  I happily live in my little parallel software universe, generate huge amounts of data that travels over these complex networks, and pay a lot of money each month for the privilege.  If you add up all of my bills – Comcast in multiple houses, a Qwest T1 to my house just outside of Boulder (since Comcast doesn’t get there), a Verizon MiFi, AT&T for my iPhone, Tmobile for Amy’s Dash, Verizon for a Droid we don’t use, lots of connectivity to my office, and probably some other stuff I don’t even know about, it’s a big number.  Oh, and that doesn’t even count all the connectively that the companies I invest in use.  You’d think – for all this – the network would be the driver of my behavior.

But notice the different providers above.  Comcast.  Verizon,  AT&T, and Tmobile.  I know my friends at Sprint must feel left out – I’ll have to figure how to get something on the Now Network.  Oh yeah, I’ve got DirectTV in one location (the one with the T1) because of – er – no Comcast to my house.  These companies are all household names for me because they spend ridiculous amounts of money on advertising – not because I love them.  Do you love any of them?

I had an interesting experience in New Orleans over the weekend.  After a day, I turned to Amy and said “have you noticed that almost everyone is walking around with an iPhone?”  I was amazed by the incredible the penetration of the iPhone.  I followed this up with “I wonder what they are all doing since I can’t get a signal on this thing worth a shit.”  Then, during the marathon on Sunday, I noticed that the vast majority of runners who had a device had one of three devices: (1) A Garmin GPS watch, (2) an iPhone, or (3) an iPod.  That was it.  Every now and then someone had a different phone.  But the number of runners with iPhone’s was remarkable.

I can assure you there weren’t using the phone for the network.  It’s pretty funny to watch someone at mile 15 of a marathon on the phone saying “Hello – can you hear me?  Damnit – fucking AT&T.”  Yes – I heard that once.  During mile 15.

I predict all those iPhones were out there because of the software, not the network.

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