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Hi, I’m Brad Feld, a managing director at the Foundry Group who lives in Boulder, Colorado. I invest in software and Internet companies around the US, run marathons and read a lot.

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My Apparently Successful Experience With Vicodin

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I had my first pain free run in five months.  And I’m very happy right now.

In March, I hurt my back.  This was my first real running injury since I started running marathons in 2003.  I’ve had some ankle twists and some knee bruises from all the trail running I do, but nothing that kept me off my feet for more than a month.  This time I lost five months ; the last time I tried to run was two months ago.

I didn’t get serious about figuring out what was going on until half way through July in Alaska when I realized I just wasn’t getting better. My pain on a daily basis never got below a three (on a 0 to 10 scale) and I often was in the six to eight range.  If you saw we get up out of a seat in the last five months, you knew I had a lower back injury.  The pain gradually settled at the very base of my spin in the middle of back – it was localized, but sharp and chronic.

So I stopped running completely, increased the amount I was swimming up to a couple of times a week, and started the process of getting professional help.  My first big goal was to rule out something serious, so I decided to get an MRI.  That took a while (doctor visit, referral, scheduling).  I had two different doctors read the MRI – each told me that there was an issue, but there was no need for surgery and steroid injections would likely be useless.  So, I started the “sign up for physical therapy process.”

In the mean time, my general practitioner gave me a prescription for vicodin.  I’m very afraid of drugs and have always avoided them.  I don’t remember if it was a movie I saw about drugs in elementary school (I saw movies on sex but never was afraid of it), my parents, or something else but they’ve just never been my thing.  I am a Vitamin I users and I used it for a while to try to manage my chronic gout, but eventually gave up and went on Allopurinol.  I’ve had other prescription medicines over the year, but I’ve stayed away from anything illegal, even our friendly herb which is basically legal in Boulder.  So the idea of taking a narcotic sort of freaked me out.

I was in so much pain after the US Open (and sitting on the stadium seats for two days) that I went ahead and took one pill.  The bottle said I could take four a day, so I figured one a day would help without being dangerous.  Amy and I flew from New York to San Diego and I took a second one.  On Friday I flew to San Francisco for the day and took a third one.   When I woke up on Saturday morning I was pain free for the first time in five months.  So I decided not to take another one on Saturday.

On Sunday when I was sitting at my computer I started to stand up and had an extremely loud “pop” happen exactly in the region where the pain has been.  Amy heard it from across the room and immediately shouted out “are you ok.”  My back then went into a spasm – something that’s only happened a few times – and for about ten seconds I couldn’t talk or breath.  But, when it stopped, I still had no pain.

I flew back to Boulder Monday morning.  I decided not to take any more vicodin until I had at least a pain level of three again.  As the week passed, the pain didn’t reappear.  On Wednesday I saw a spine specialist who works with athletes as part of the PT referral process.  I spent 30 minutes telling him the story from beginning to end and then we went and looked at the MRI together.  He again confirmed that surgery was unnecessary and – more importantly – that the MRI showed a few clear signs of distress that would explain the chronic pain, but that steroid injections would be useless.  We did a few diagnostic things and then he gave me his hypothesis.

He suggested that it’s likely that the small amount of vicodin I took broke the pain cycle I had been stuck in.  Once the pain was gone, my body was able to move in certain ways that resulted in a natural adjustment (the big pop) of an area of my back that was stuck.  Having it adjust naturally was much more effective than if I’d gone to a chiropractor.  It had never occurred to me that this would happen, but when I think about the number of times my back adjusts in other spots when it gets out of whack this made perfect sense to me.

I’ve now had a week of no back pain.  I haven’t taken anything – not even Vitamin I – in a week.  I went for a few swims this week and a short run today.  I feel great.

For everyone out there that has been patient with me, offered suggestions, and provided help over the past five months, thank you.  Who knows whether this really solved the problem or not but this is the first time in a while that I’ve been optimistic about it.

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