Brad's Books and Organizations

Books

Books

Organizations

Organizations

Hi, I’m Brad Feld, a managing director at the Foundry Group who lives in Boulder, Colorado. I invest in software and Internet companies around the US, run marathons and read a lot.

« swipe left for tags/categories

swipe right to go back »

Soldotna, Alaska Rotary 10 Mile Race

Comments (16)

Amy and I woke up at 5am this morning (which was still several hours after dawn here in Homer, AK) to head the big city of Soldotna, Alaska (population 4,087) to run the 2008 Soldotna Rotary Unity 10 Mile Race.  As part of my marathon training I’ve decided to run a lot more races between 10k and a half marathon to try to build up my "racing brain" while having some extra fun wherever I happen to be in the world.

Soldotna is about 75 miles from Homer.  I snoozed while Amy drove.  She woke me once to inform me that there was a moose on the side of the road and asked if I wanted to stop and take a picture.  Since I’m afraid of horses, and a moose looks like three horses stapled together to me, I declined and went back to sleep.  We got to Soldotna High School (home of the Soldotna Stars) and met up with the other 100 or so people involved in the race.

 

CIMG0274

About 50 of us hopped on a yellow school bus and drove to the bustling metropolis of Kenai, Alaska (population 7,464) and stopped at the Kenai High School (home of Kardinals).  Ten minutes later the 50 of us lined up at the starting line painted on the ground in the school parking lot and took off on our race back to Soldotna.

Since I’m targeting a 4:45 marathon in Ashton, Idaho next month, I decided to do the first half in 55 minutes (11 minute miles) and then see what I had in me, being happy with anything under 1:50.  I had a hard time holding myself back – my first mile was in 9:16 and my second mile was in 9:48.  I think at this point I was near the back of the very small pack.  I managed to settle down and did the next three miles around 10:30 and then realized that I was probably in last place.  I felt great so I kicked it into gear.

I cruised through the second half of the race and executed on the elusive perfect negative split (where every subsequent mile in the second half of a race is faster than the previous mile.)  9:45.  9:14:  8:36.  8:26. 7:58.  Total time: 1:34:30.  Avg HR: 154. Max HR: 190.  I passed seven people between mile 5 and mile 7, so I came in 8th from last.

CIMG0283

For the full data, take a look at what my trusty Garmin 305 recorded (yes – I have a 405 – it arrived yesterday – but I didn’t want to tempt the new device monster by trying a virgin 405 on my race.)  We grabbed some lunch at Froso’s in Soldotna, Amy drove home (and I napped), and then I took a shower and napped some more.  I feel great – we’ll see how I’m doing at mile 10 of my 13 mile run tomorrow.

  • Aziz Grieser

    Congrats roadrunner. You need some tiny video camera you could attach to your cap or shoulder and record your run. Preferably one that FTP upload somewhere every time it got a wireless signal. That way I could feel like I was running all these marathons.
    :)

  • matt shobe

    Negative splits: nice!

    I look forward to your take on the 405 in some subsequent post (or even just a tweet or two). My 205 died a while back and I've been incredibly lazy where any replacement effort is concerned.

  • http://www.howardlindzon.com howard lindzon

    nice pictures and experience. I am training to do a marathon with you.

    • http://www.feld.com Brad Feld

      I look forward to running it with you. Maybe I’ll finally finish in front of someone!

  • http://blog.travelfli.com Krista

    Great job on the negative split. I think my miles get slower as I run. Completed my first (ever!) half marathon yesterday in 1:45:51. Legs hurt today but it felt good. Running the Georgetown>Idaho Springs next month. Have you done this one before?
    http://www.active.com/page/Event_Details.htm?even

    • http://www.feld.com Brad Feld

      I haven’t done the Georgetown to Idaho Springs one.  That’ll be a challenge because of the altitude!

      • http://blog.travelfli.com Krista

        Yep. My friend is flying in from Chicago to run it with me. She's pretty concerned about it. Good luck on the half today! You've probably finished it already and have moved into serious R&R!

        • http://www.feld.com Brad Feld

          Yup – knocked out 13 miles in 2:20 which was about 10 minutes faster than I had expected.  Now it’s time to lay on the floor for a while and then eat a lot of food tonigh.

          • http://blog.travelfli.com Krista

            Great time on that run! You deserve all the floor time you want. That's always the first place I look for after a long one…

          • test

            test

  • http://www.me.dium.com/search tobias

    hey brad, interesting approach to run 10k at marathon pace. there's a theory that if you develop your fast twitch (e.g. blast your 10ks a little bit) you can then learn to take that speed up a distance – which could have major impact on your marathon times. I've tried this approach on a lower distance set. i.e. for years i was running 10ks (at the end of triathlons) in about 44-45mins (7:30 min miles). I just couldn't get below it. Then i switched to sprinting reps in training, and running 5k races at 6 min miles (throwing up at first… but gradually getting there over the course of one New York Road Runners season ;). Then i started to try and bring that sort of pace/mindset into my triathlon 10ks. Last year, i broke 40mins in all my races… and set a PR (in the Westchester tri) of 37something (~6:30 min miles). Now… i'm not the most competitive of athletes out there… so the reason i go into detail here is to say: “if i can do it, so can you”.

    But let's say that all sounds like too much effort… Your theme here of (what I would call) “putting on your race face” every now and again is good one. My old soccer coach used to say “practice makes persistent”. My triathlon coaches always preach “specificity of training”. They're coming at it from different angles, and for different reasons, but the general point is the same: simulate race day often, and on your actual race day everything will seem like normal.

    Good luck!

    • http://www.feld.com Brad Feld

      Tobias – I totally agree.  If this was a 10k I would have gone out faster.  Since it was a 10 miler, I figured I’d do the first 5 miles at marathon pace and then crank the last five miles as hard as I could.  I obviously couldn’t hold myself back on the first five miles to my marathon pace, but it didn’t seem to have an impact on the second half.

      Thanks – as always – for the suggestions.  Must … get … faster!

  • Bill Mosby

    So you're going to Ashton, Idaho soon. I spent a fondly-remembered 27 years in nearby Idaho Falls. I remember a lot of winter trips through Ashton to go x-c skiing at Harriman Park, Yellowstone, and other nearby spots. Lovely part of the country. We tried to keep it a secret as long as possible, but eventually we were found out!

  • http://www.komar.org/ alek

    Brad says: “Since I'm afraid of horses, and a moose looks like three horses stapled together to me … ”

    So when you are back home in Colorado, do you close your eyes when you are driving across Rocky Mountain National Park? ;-)

    There's basically Elk everywhere (do they look like two horses stapled together?) along with an occasional Moose – here's some pictures for 'ya … although yea, Momma and Baby Moose aren't all the cute and the stapled analogy isn't bad.

    http://www.komar.org/faq/travel/vacation/colorado
    http://www.komar.org/faq/travel/vacation/colorado

    • http://www.feld.com Brad Feld

      Yes – I am scared of Elk (and Deer) also.  Bambi was never my idea of a friend.  I close my eyes regularly.

  • howard lindzon

    nice pictures and experience. I am training to do a marathon with you.

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/aziz_griese5636 aziz_griese5636

    Congrats roadrunner. You need some tiny video camera you could attach to your cap or shoulder and record your run. Preferably one that FTP upload somewhere every time it got a wireless signal. That way I could feel like I was running all these marathons.
    :)

  • Bill Mosby

    So you're going to Ashton, Idaho soon. I spent a fondly-remembered 27 years in nearby Idaho Falls. I remember a lot of winter trips through Ashton to go x-c skiing at Harriman Park, Yellowstone, and other nearby spots. Lovely part of the country. We tried to keep it a secret as long as possible, but eventually we were found out!

  • matt shobe

    Negative splits: nice!

    I look forward to your take on the 405 in some subsequent post (or even just a tweet or two). My 205 died a while back and I've been incredibly lazy where any replacement effort is concerned.

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/bfeld bfeld

    I look forward to running it with you. Maybe I’ll finally finish in front of someone!

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/bfeld bfeld

    I haven’t done the Georgetown to Idaho Springs one.  That’ll be a challenge because of the altitude!

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/krista51951 krista51951

    Great time on that run! You deserve all the floor time you want. That's always the first place I look for after a long one…

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/bfeld bfeld

    Tobias – I totally agree.  If this was a 10k I would have gone out faster.  Since it was a 10 miler, I figured I’d do the first 5 miles at marathon pace and then crank the last five miles as hard as I could.  I obviously couldn’t hold myself back on the first five miles to my marathon pace, but it didn’t seem to have an impact on the second half.

    Thanks – as always – for the suggestions.  Must … get … faster!

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/bfeld bfeld

    Yup – knocked out 13 miles in 2:20 which was about 10 minutes faster than I had expected.  Now it’s time to lay on the floor for a while and then eat a lot of food tonigh.

    • test

      test

  • alek

    Ahhhhhh … then in case you haven't seen it, be sure to watch (and keep your eyes open) the classic short movie:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tAVYYe87b9w
    Background info on it here – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bambi_Meets_Godzilla
    alek

    P.S. I'm surprised (assuming you are serious) about your deer phobia – I bet you have 'em come by daily at your place in Eldo Springs.

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/bfeld bfeld

    Yes – I am scared of Elk (and Deer) also.  Bambi was never my idea of a friend.  I close my eyes regularly.

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/krista51951 krista51951

    Great job on the negative split. I think my miles get slower as I run. Completed my first (ever!) half marathon yesterday in 1:45:51. Legs hurt today but it felt good. Running the Georgetown>Idaho Springs next month. Have you done this one before?
    http://www.active.com/page/Event_Details.htm?even

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/krista51951 krista51951

    Yep. My friend is flying in from Chicago to run it with me. She's pretty concerned about it. Good luck on the half today! You've probably finished it already and have moved into serious R&R!

  • tobias

    hey brad, interesting approach to run 10k at marathon pace. there's a theory that if you develop your fast twitch (e.g. blast your 10ks a little bit) you can then learn to take that speed up a distance – which could have major impact on your marathon times. I've tried this approach on a lower distance set. i.e. for years i was running 10ks (at the end of triathlons) in about 44-45mins (7:30 min miles). I just couldn't get below it. Then i switched to sprinting reps in training, and running 5k races at 6 min miles (throwing up at first… but gradually getting there over the course of one New York Road Runners season ;). Then i started to try and bring that sort of pace/mindset into my triathlon 10ks. Last year, i broke 40mins in all my races… and set a PR (in the Westchester tri) of 37something (~6:30 min miles). Now… i'm not the most competitive of athletes out there… so the reason i go into detail here is to say: "if i can do it, so can you".

    But let's say that all sounds like too much effort… Your theme here of (what I would call) "putting on your race face" every now and again is good one. My old soccer coach used to say "practice makes persistent". My triathlon coaches always preach "specificity of training". They're coming at it from different angles, and for different reasons, but the general point is the same: simulate race day often, and on your actual race day everything will seem like normal.

    Good luck!

  • alek

    Brad says: "Since I'm afraid of horses, and a moose looks like three horses stapled together to me … "

    So when you are back home in Colorado, do you close your eyes when you are driving across Rocky Mountain National Park? ;-)

    There's basically Elk everywhere (do they look like two horses stapled together?) along with an occasional Moose – here's some pictures for 'ya … although yea, Momma and Baby Moose aren't all the cute and the stapled analogy isn't bad.

    http://www.komar.org/faq/travel/vacation/colorado
    http://www.komar.org/faq/travel/vacation/colorado

Build something great with me