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Hi, I’m Brad Feld, a managing director at the Foundry Group who lives in Boulder, Colorado. I invest in software and Internet companies around the US, run marathons and read a lot.

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Excellent Story on the Failure of Monitor110

Comments (2)

It’s unusual for a founder to write a long thoughtful post on the failure of his company.  Roger Ehrenberg – the co-founder of Monitor110 – which shut down earlier this week, did just that on his outstanding post titled Monitor110: A Post Mortem.  The post is oriented around Roger’s "seven deadly sins":

  1. The lack of a single, "the buck stops here" leader until too late in the game
  2. No separation between the technology organization and the product organization
  3. Too much PR, too early
  4. Too much money
  5. Not close enough to the customer
  6. Slow to adapt to market reality
  7. Disagreement on strategy both within the Company and with the Board

Every person in every company that I’m involved with should read this post carefully.  Every entrepreneur should also.  Failure is part of the entrepreneur experience – Roger has done us all a great service by being willing to be deeply introspective and share his thoughts on what went wrong at Monitor110 in such a direct way.

  • http://friendfeed.com/robinseidner Robin Seidner

    interesting his point about the financial times article, as that was a big wake-up call at Collective Intellect that the market for this was progressing. apparently, wasn't the case.

  • http://www.burnertrouble.com Martin Edic

    I think the market is there- they just entered pretty early and possibly didn't let the market define itself. They might have found out that it was a lot more than financial. That the bunker mentality of trying to build something 'perfect' doesn't work for start-ups these days is the lesson I took from this. I've worked in both scenarios and with Techrigy things are a lot more flexible. We screw up but we also keep improving which seems to be what the customers really want- they know this is new territory.

  • http://barfieldmanagement.com Chase Barfield

    I couldn't agree with your “Failure” comment more. Alter your perception and instead of looking at your mistakes as negatives, view them as lessons and try not to make them again. After all, human beings learn from mistakes. Robert Kiyosaki stated in one of his audios, “If we did not learn from our mistakes, no one would be able to walk.”

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/martin_edi18731 martin_edi18731

    I think the market is there- they just entered pretty early and possibly didn't let the market define itself. They might have found out that it was a lot more than financial. That the bunker mentality of trying to build something 'perfect' doesn't work for start-ups these days is the lesson I took from this. I've worked in both scenarios and with Techrigy things are a lot more flexible. We screw up but we also keep improving which seems to be what the customers really want- they know this is new territory.

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/chase_barf55451 chase_barf55451

    I couldn't agree with your "Failure" comment more. Alter your perception and instead of looking at your mistakes as negatives, view them as lessons and try not to make them again. After all, human beings learn from mistakes. Robert Kiyosaki stated in one of his audios, “If we did not learn from our mistakes, no one would be able to walk.”

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