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Hi, I’m Brad Feld, a managing director at the Foundry Group who lives in Boulder, Colorado. I invest in software and Internet companies around the US, run marathons and read a lot.

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The Long List of Interesting Stuff This Morning

Comments (10)

It’s Friday and there’s a remarkable amount of interesting stuff that came out of my morning "catch up on blog / email" routine.  I was going to write a couple of different blogs, but then realized that I didn’t have a lot to add to any of them other than "read this – it’s interesting."  There are a few "linkblogs" that I follow, but I find many break down quickly and become just "lists of more stuff."

I’m curious – if I started linking to the top few things (up to five – of any sort) that I read each morning with a brief description, would this be interesting to you dear reader? This is coming from the set of 500 or so blogs I scan via FeedDemon each morning.  Please give me feedback – do you like this or is it just another ponderous set of links to ignore.

Let’s try it and see.

Rock-and-Roll Fantasy: A fun article in Newsweek about Alex Rigopulos and Eran Egozy – the two founders of Harmonix – and how they are changing videogames.  They also got a well deserved mention in Time’s 100 Top Techies.

A Sporting Gesture Touches ‘Em All: This is a beautiful story about something that I expect would never happen in baseball, but happened in a college girls softball game. 

Data Centers Are Becoming Big Polluters, Study Finds: I brought this up as an example at a CU Silicon Flatirons Roundtable I was part of yesterday.  I got it slightly wrong – the punchline is that the world’s data centers are projected to surpass the airline industry as a greenhouse gas polluter by 2020.

More Signup Power: Bill Flagg of RegOnline talks about how he has continuously optimized the RegOnline signon page to maximize the conversion rate.  Web services companies – take notice.

Tomorrow’s Forecast: Cloudy Skies & Sunshine: Jud Valeski – the CTO and co-founder of Gnip (one of our new companies) writes about his first blush experiences with Amazon Web Services (AWS for those of you in the know.)

  • Martha

    I like this format – it's like a lead-in to the evening news… well, in this case, the morning news! It give you a chance to see the interesting stuff that will be talked about, and then you can make the choice to read it, or not.. By the way – great story about the sporting gesture – thanks for sharing that one!

  • proales

    I like it… you might setup a everything but non-daily link feed for people who want that though. (would be easy with a Y! Pipe)

  • Mark-Salinas-Viscom

    I like it. I guess we all like it! Mark it down on the interesting list. Keep it coming!

    Mark Salinas
    Viscom Technology Group, MN

  • http://www.venturedeal.com Don Jones

    Good stuff, Brad. Your commentary is a good filter.

  • Steve Bergstein

    This reader likes the pointer to stories of interest. Books too. Anything that helps to separate the wheat from the chaff. And, of course, I like reading about Eran.

  • Geoffrey

    It's an interesting premise, and it might be worth doing, but I think that most of us who are subscribed tot his blog are subscribed for the editorial nature of it as opposed to the information presented. So please don't stop writing posts (which I'm sure wasn't your intention in the first place).

  • Jeff Widman

    I like it if you have commentary that serves as a clear filter. And an option to keep it separate–like the above commenter.

    What is your morning blog reading/e-mail routine? How long does it take you?
    I struggle to find a balance between imbibing and generating content–too easy to just input without ever outputting!

    • http://www.feld.com Brad Feld

      I get up every morning during the week at 5am. I make a cup of coffee, feed the dogs, and sit down at my computer for about 90 minutes. I read / reply to all outstanding email (goal – inbox zero), read my “daily” tab in Firefox (all of the daily newspapers and sites I read), and scan through all my feeds in FeedDemon (500 + another 300 or so search and internal company feeds). Whatever time I have left I blog.

  • Deb Miller

    I can't imagine getting through 500+ feeds, let alone email, etc, in 90 minutes. I use your blog and a couple of others to point me to other interesting things, so adding a few links like this would be great. Most of the lists I've tried just don't work for me. Not everything you are interested in, interests me, but you give enough so that I know whether to read .

  • http://www.clevy.tumblr.com Cory Levy

    One of the Rabbis that works at my school played the clip/story of the girls softball game to the entire school last Friday. He was not sure if it was true or not, but this NY Times article proves it.

  • Mark-Salinas-Viscom

    I like it. I guess we all like it! Mark it down on the interesting list. Keep it coming!

    Mark Salinas
    Viscom Technology Group, MN

  • Don Jones

    Good stuff, Brad. Your commentary is a good filter.

  • Geoffrey

    It's an interesting premise, and it might be worth doing, but I think that most of us who are subscribed tot his blog are subscribed for the editorial nature of it as opposed to the information presented. So please don't stop writing posts (which I'm sure wasn't your intention in the first place).

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/steve_bergs2127 steve_bergs2127

    This reader likes the pointer to stories of interest. Books too. Anything that helps to separate the wheat from the chaff. And, of course, I like reading about Eran.

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/jeff_widma16241 jeff_widma16241

    I like it if you have commentary that serves as a clear filter. And an option to keep it separate–like the above commenter.

    What is your morning blog reading/e-mail routine? How long does it take you?
    I struggle to find a balance between imbibing and generating content–too easy to just input without ever outputting!

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/martha3408 martha3408

    I like this format – it's like a lead-in to the evening news… well, in this case, the morning news! It give you a chance to see the interesting stuff that will be talked about, and then you can make the choice to read it, or not.. By the way – great story about the sporting gesture – thanks for sharing that one!

  • proales

    I like it… you might setup a everything but non-daily link feed for people who want that though. (would be easy with a Y! Pipe)

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/bfeld bfeld

    I get up every morning during the week at 5am. I make a cup of coffee, feed the dogs, and sit down at my computer for about 90 minutes. I read / reply to all outstanding email (goal – inbox zero), read my “daily” tab in Firefox (all of the daily newspapers and sites I read), and scan through all my feeds in FeedDemon (500 + another 300 or so search and internal company feeds). Whatever time I have left I blog.

  • Deb Miller

    I can't imagine getting through 500+ feeds, let alone email, etc, in 90 minutes. I use your blog and a couple of others to point me to other interesting things, so adding a few links like this would be great. Most of the lists I've tried just don't work for me. Not everything you are interested in, interests me, but you give enough so that I know whether to read .

  • Cory Levy

    One of the Rabbis that works at my school played the clip/story of the girls softball game to the entire school last Friday. He was not sure if it was true or not, but this NY Times article proves it.

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