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Hi, I’m Brad Feld, a managing director at the Foundry Group who lives in Boulder, Colorado. I invest in software and Internet companies around the US, run marathons and read a lot.

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Online Reading For A Three Day Weekend

Comments (5)

I love three day weekends – there is something magical about the complete change of pace a three day weekend has on the United States.  I really wish we’d take a page from some other countries and turn these into four day weekends (that go from Friday to Monday) but I’ll savor my delicious three day weekends anyway.

I’m getting ready to head out for a two hour run but thought I’d leave you with some interesting reading from my morning (yes – even when I’m enjoying a three day weekend I go ahead and do my morning routine, albeit a little later then the normal 5am slot.)

- What’s The Greatest Software Ever Written?an oldie but a goodie via Tim O’Reilly via Twitter!  Microsoft, Apple, and Google only have one each in the top 12.  IBM has two, Bell Labs has one, and Sun has 1.5.  Great, provocative list.

- Why can’t you create a calendar from your email?Pete Warden’s rants and thoughts on email are super.  We tried this once in the late 1990′s with a company called Neomeo which wasn’t successful as a standalone, but it was acquired by Postini shortly after our investment in Postini, which subsequently became a huge success.  It’s insane that it’s 2008 and I’m still dragging emails onto a calendar icon to manually create a calendar entry.

- How to read a business book – Even though I find all business books to be 50% to 75% too long, I still read some.  Seth Godin has some fantastic tips for how to actually read a business book and get value out of them.  As a special bonus, Seth tells you how you could have a chance to be on the cover of (his) new book.

- Business Development in a Web 2.0 World – Micah Baldwin has been kicking ass running business development at Lijit.  His ideas are worth reading.

If you are in the US, happy memorial day.  Don’t twitter to much – make sure you go to a bbq instead.  If you are running the Bolder Boulder, I’ll see you there along with 52,998 of our friends.

  • http://blog.jparkhill.com Jay Parkhill

    That's funny. I used to live in Japan and wished they'd take a page from our book. Official holidays there always seem to be on Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday- ruining a shot at a nice 3 day weekend.

  • Dave Harding

    Stop dragging dates from email… Click on a date in your apple mail and it automatically creates an ical entry that links back to the email. Also, click on a phone number or name and it will automatically create, or link to, your contacts. Which is all linked to their rising market share.

  • Rob Freeborn

    Wouldn't the logical problem be that you don't WANT every date that floats by your email inbox to become associated with your calendar?

    One way that I could see this being useful is if every time I dragged an email (or task or anything else) onto the Calendar folder in Outlook that it automagically grabbed the date info and pre-populate that for me.

    The debate, in my mind at least, is quite similar to opt in vs. opt out. Do you want ALL date info embedded in email associated to your calendar or just the date info you are interested in?

    r.

    • http://www.feld.com Brad Feld

      Yup – definitely.

      • Rob Freeborn

        So I just saw a feature in Gmail that is in line with this discussion.

        Gmail saw that there was an address in the email that I received and, unobtrusively, gave me an option in the top right column to map that address. In a way, the feature was almost “too” unobtrusive as I have no idea how long this feature has been living in Gmail interface!

        Maybe it's something more like this that Outlook enables – or something similar to how Blackberry handles phone number, highlighting them and enabling an appointment to be automatically set based on some predefined search parameters focused on the content of the email.

        r.

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/jay_parkhil2393 jay_parkhil2393

    That's funny. I used to live in Japan and wished they'd take a page from our book. Official holidays there always seem to be on Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday- ruining a shot at a nice 3 day weekend.

  • Dave Harding

    Stop dragging dates from email… Click on a date in your apple mail and it automatically creates an ical entry that links back to the email. Also, click on a phone number or name and it will automatically create, or link to, your contacts. Which is all linked to their rising market share.

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/bfeld bfeld

    Yup – definitely.

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/rob_freebor8945 rob_freebor8945

    Wouldn't the logical problem be that you don't WANT every date that floats by your email inbox to become associated with your calendar?

    One way that I could see this being useful is if every time I dragged an email (or task or anything else) onto the Calendar folder in Outlook that it automagically grabbed the date info and pre-populate that for me.

    The debate, in my mind at least, is quite similar to opt in vs. opt out. Do you want ALL date info embedded in email associated to your calendar or just the date info you are interested in?

    r.

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/rob_freebor8945 rob_freebor8945

    So I just saw a feature in Gmail that is in line with this discussion.

    Gmail saw that there was an address in the email that I received and, unobtrusively, gave me an option in the top right column to map that address. In a way, the feature was almost "too" unobtrusive as I have no idea how long this feature has been living in Gmail interface!

    Maybe it's something more like this that Outlook enables – or something similar to how Blackberry handles phone number, highlighting them and enabling an appointment to be automatically set based on some predefined search parameters focused on the content of the email.

    r.

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