Brad's Books and Organizations

Books

Books

Organizations

Organizations

Hi, I’m Brad Feld, a managing director at the Foundry Group who lives in Boulder, Colorado. I invest in software and Internet companies around the US, run marathons and read a lot.

« swipe left for tags/categories

swipe right to go back »

The Email APIs Are Coming – But Where Are They?

Comments (2)

Pete Warden has a good post up titled Google, Yahoo and MSN Mail APIsIn it, he points at the various “sort of APIs” that are “sort of public.”  Later that day, in response to Pete’s post (not really) Google released the Google Apps Email Migration API.  Progress.  Deva Hazarika – who runs ClearContext – followed with a post titled The three I’s of “Inbox 2.0” where he suggests the issue isn’t the inbox, but the address book. Finally Matt Blumberg, who attended the top secret email meeting that was at Fred Wilson’s office last week, finished us off with In Search of Automated Relevance where he talks about “the channel of communication.”

While a universal set of APIs isn’t the solution, I find the need for an API in the context of the ubiquitousness of SMTP to be entertaining.  Most of the “sort of APIs” are limited in some way (one directional, not secure, not all inclusive, limited to a finite amount of traffic, available only to premium accounts, broken.)  As far as I can tell, none of these APIs really address the core issues in Deva or Matt’s posts.

I shudder to think that we need another abstraction (integration?) layer.  But maybe we do, especially when you broaden “email” to “messaging.” 

  • Robert

    http://avc.blogs.com/a_vc/2007/11/the-social-grap
    http://www.radicati.com/brochure.asp?id=477

    Howard Lindzon had some input on Fred's blog. I tend to agree with his assessment that it's the leverage of the social graph that is most important here. No matter what your application is (i.e. e-mail relevancy), you need to leverage the social graph.

    I'm mostly interested in the application of this concept in the enterprise sector (no news there). With spending in the “enterprise social software” sector expected to reach $3.3B by 2011, at least according to Radicati, there appears to be a real need to leverage the social graph.

    Also, I agree with the “messaging not e-mail” statement. While e-mail is the current standard in the enterprise, there's no reason to believe instant messaging, blogs, and intra-service communication won't see just as much (or more) adoption.

  • http://www.emaildashboard.com Deva Hazarika

    Brad, rather than “he suggests the issue isn’t the inbox, but the address book” I'd say that I suggest (huh?!) the issue most of those posts talked about is the address book, but the real issue is much broader – precisely what you and others are now touching on regarding messaging. I added 4 A's to the 3 I's here: http://www.emaildashboard.com/2007/11/the-four-as

    Also, the “Loading” wait for IntenseDebate is annoying.

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/deva_hazari2084 deva_hazari2084

    Brad, rather than "he suggests the issue isn’t the inbox, but the address book" I'd say that I suggest (huh?!) the issue most of those posts talked about is the address book, but the real issue is much broader – precisely what you and others are now touching on regarding messaging. I added 4 A's to the 3 I's here: http://www.emaildashboard.com/2007/11/the-four-as

    Also, the "Loading" wait for IntenseDebate is annoying.

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/robert960 robert960

    http://avc.blogs.com/a_vc/2007/11/the-social-grap
    http://www.radicati.com/brochure.asp?id=477

    Howard Lindzon had some input on Fred's blog. I tend to agree with his assessment that it's the leverage of the social graph that is most important here. No matter what your application is (i.e. e-mail relevancy), you need to leverage the social graph.

    I'm mostly interested in the application of this concept in the enterprise sector (no news there). With spending in the "enterprise social software" sector expected to reach $3.3B by 2011, at least according to Radicati, there appears to be a real need to leverage the social graph.

    Also, I agree with the "messaging not e-mail" statement. While e-mail is the current standard in the enterprise, there's no reason to believe instant messaging, blogs, and intra-service communication won't see just as much (or more) adoption.

Build something great with me