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Hi, I’m Brad Feld, a managing director at the Foundry Group who lives in Boulder, Colorado. I invest in software and Internet companies around the US, run marathons and read a lot.

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Lijit Stats

Comments (3)

I love stats (I guess the “official” software term for it is “analytics.”) My very first angel investment was in a company called NetGenesis which was one of the first web analytics companies (back in 1994).  It’s a regular theme in my investing – either directly in companies like NetGenesis and Service Metrics (where analytics is the product), or indirectly in companies like FeedBurner (where analytics is a byproduct and a core part of the value.)

Lijit just rolled out their search stats.  If you want to see something cool, take a look at my Lijit search stats.  This is the information being searched for in my Lijit Search Wijit (titled “Personal Network Search”) on Feld Thoughts.

The number of searches by day fascinates me since I’m solidly in the 80 – 100 range, which is much more than I expected.  The source of clicked results is equally fascinating since it’s a starting point for understand who I’m driving traffic to as a result of searches on my network (not just my blog – but people I trust as authorities on subjects I care about.)

Stan James (Lijit founder / CTO) has an blog up that goes more thorougly through the stats.  In addition, he recently posted his preliminary results from the blogroll ranking experiment that he’s run.  All the expected disclaimers apply, but the blogroll spider is out on the web doing it’s thing and Stan is applying his giant brain to the data to try to figure out how to mathematically determine the “implicit trust network” that is contained in blogroll information.

  • http://www.leveragingideas.com Squasher98

    I’m a fan of Lijit, but after seeing those screen shots I admit to feeling a little “big brother” phobia. Analytics are wonderful but if you can see what people searched for, you can see who searched for what as well… makes you (me) wonder.

    http://www.leveragingideas.com

  • http://www.feld.com Brad Feld

    As a user of Lijit (me), I have complete control over whether or not the world can see this data. I chose to have it public. The default is for it to be private.

    The “searcher” is anonymous.

  • http://ben.casnocha.com Ben Casnocha

    Fascinating. I’m flattered that “casnocha” is a top 25 search term — and “ben” is also on there, but I wouldn’t be so quick to assume that’s me!

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