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Hi, I’m Brad Feld, a managing director at the Foundry Group who lives in Boulder, Colorado. I invest in software and Internet companies around the US, run marathons and read a lot.

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What Did You Do This Week To Help Victims of Hurricane Katrina?

Comments (4)

As I get caught up on various blogs I subscribe to, I’ve seen many suggestions, actions, and wonderful stories of help for Katrina victims this week.  Most of the companies I’m involved in did something – ranging from contributing a percentage of September revenue to sending folks down to volunteer.

Rick Segal wrote about what one of his portfolio companies – which makes kits that enable light steel buildings – is doing.  Money helps, but active deployment of new technologies to help is great leverage – both for this situation and in advance of the next inevitable disaster.  My understanding is that Rick’s company GenesisTP is offering up the use of their facility at their cost to help enable the rapid creation of new buildings.  Rick / GenesisTP aren’t looking to make money on this disaster – rather they are taking a longer term view around the value of the IP they are creating while getting real experience and exposure to disaster scenarios which they can then use to proactively sell their technology / IP in advance of the next catastrophe like this.

  • http://www.4setup.com Greg Burton

    The usual – volunteering at a foodbank sorting supplies, linking to the Red Cross on all my sites, contributing to the Red Cross.

    The unusual – starting the Recovery 2.0 wiki at http://www.4setup.com . Recovery 2.0 is a project to coordinate open-source disaster recovery software initiatives. We hope to be a clearinghouse for information, standards, and code design and discussion.

  • Kurt Foeller

    Brad – per your comment on “active deployment of new technologies…” I just learned that my client, Kapow Technologies, donated a full version of its integration software and an engineer to power http://www.katrinashelter.com. Through the use of robots that integrate data from the front-end GUIs of other smaller housing sites, Katrina Shelter provides a simple “one stop shop” to choose from more than 4,000 (and counting) spaces available across the southeast region. This is an example where well-placed and well-deployed technology can be more powerful than the donated dollar.

  • Dan

    How is:

    “[taking] a longer term view around the value of the IP they are creating while getting real experience and exposure to disaster scenarios which they can then use to proactively sell their technology / IP in advance of the next catastrophe like this”

    not making money?

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