Brad's Books and Organizations

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Hi, I’m Brad Feld, a managing director at the Foundry Group who lives in Boulder, Colorado. I invest in software and Internet companies around the US, run marathons and read a lot.

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Summer Books – 2005

Comments (4)

My goal this summer when I was at my place in Alaska was to read a book a day. I didn’t make it, but still covered a lot of ground by reading 28 books in the 60 days we were there.  Following is a short synopsis with ratings from 1 to 5 (1=sucks, 5=awesome) with the books segmented by category.  If I’ve reviewed the book on my site, I’ve linked the rating number to the review.

The best book of the summer – uncontested – was Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close.  I highly recommend all of the books I rated as 5’s.  All the 4’s are also must read if you are into the topic.  The rest are hit or miss.

Biography

Business

  • FAB: (5): The “personal fabricator” will be to innovation what the personal computer was in the 1980’s.  Read about the today’s version of the future of custom fabrication.
  • Economics of Innocent Fraud: (4) John Kenneth Galbraith’s short treatise on a very contemporary topic – fraud.
  • Jim Cramer’s Real Money: (1) Don’t waste your time – watch CNBC’s Mad Money instead.

History

Literary Fiction

Mental Floss

  • Killing Rain: (5): John Rain solves problems and gets laid – with grace.
  • How I Paid for College: (5): Absolutely hysterical.  I picked it up randomly at the Homer Bookstore – a high school senior’s romp through – well – teenage stuff (sex, drugs, rock and roll, parents, college, money, sex).
  • Metro Girl: (3): Janet Evanovich tries a different set of characters – it’s pretty good.
  • Eleven on Top: (1): I think I’m done with Stephanie Plum.

Philosophy

Reference

Science Fiction / Fantasy

Happy reading!

  • Dave Jilk

    For a different approach to reading:

    - Quicksilver (Neal Stephenson). a 4: Great romp through the late 17th century, bringing together the history of science, politics, and religion with characters real and fictitious. Can be a little hard to follow, I started this over my New Year’s break at the beginning of the year. The Confusion is next.

    - An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (John Locke) a 4: a great book by one of the founders of modern empiricism, Locke could afford to dispense with a few of the double, triple, and quadruple negatives and comma diarrhea that, would I not but have had great interest, then, in this topic, I could not have but, by your leave, put it down long ago. Started this one at the beginning of the summer, read it every day, I’m about 80% done.

  • David Smith

    Thanks for the list. Are you a speed reader?

  • Derald Muniz

    That’s a lot of fucking books. LOL.

  • Trey Courtney

    It would be interesting if Amazon allowed you to post your rating of the book in the Recently Read section. The last thing I want to do is go directly to Amazon and have to read through all the reviews.

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