Brad's Books and Organizations

Books

Books

Organizations

Organizations

Hi, I’m Brad Feld, a managing director at the Foundry Group who lives in Boulder, Colorado. I invest in software and Internet companies around the US, run marathons and read a lot.

« swipe left for tags/categories

swipe right to go back »

Speed Up Firefox with Pipelining

Comments (12)

I’ve been using Firefox for a while and love it.  I’m waiting patiently for my beta of IE 7.0 to see how they’ve done, but for now I’m addicted to Firefox.  My partner Greg Galanos (another software nerd – he used to run Metrowerks) sent me the tweaks to turn on pipelining in Firefox.  The performance improvement is awesome.  If you are a Firefox user on a high speed line (don’t try this on dialup), try the following:

Go to the address bar in Firefox and type in “about:config”

Look for the following lines:

  • network.http.pipelining = false
  • network.http.pipelining.maxrequests = 4
  • network.http.proxy.pipelining = false

Change them to (by click/double-click the line):

  • network.http.pipelining = true
  • network.http.pipelining.maxrequests = 30
  • network.http.proxy.pipelining = true

This configures the browser to make 30 requests at once and not wait for a reply to the request before making another request

Then you need to create one new option:

  • Right click anywhere on the page and select New-> Integer.
  • Name it “nglayout.initialpaint.delay”
  • Set its value to “0″.

This value is the amount of time the browser waits before it acts on information it receives.  You need to restart Firefox for this to be enabled. On sites that support pipelining (not all do) the results are dramatic.

  • http://www.nivi.com/blog Nivi

    This extension will turn on pipelining and make other changes to speed up Firefox. It lets you turn these mods on and off with the click of a button.

    http://www.bitstorm.org/extensions/tweak/

  • Michael

    Brad:

    This is very cool. But which sites support pipelining? If they don’t, why? (Excluding the “some people don’t know about it” answer.)

    Thanks!

  • http://tatler.typepad.com/nose/2005/06/firefox_hack_an.html The NOSE: Alfred Ess

    Firefox Hack and HTTP Pipelining

    Here's a great hack (via Feld Thoughts and Subterrrain.net) to make Firefox download pages faster for broadband users. Browser requests are normally processed sequentially by the web server. HTTP pipelining allows multiple requests to be processed toge…

  • http://tatler.typepad.com/nose/2005/06/firefox_hack_an.html The NOSE: Alfred Ess

    Firefox Hack and HTTP Pipelining

    Here's a great hack (via Feld Thoughts and Subterrrain.net) to make Firefox download pages faster for broadband users. Browser requests are normally processed sequentially by the web server. HTTP pipelining allows multiple requests to be processed toge…

  • http://www.ueland.com Chris Ueland

    One thing I’ve been playing with is Google’s caching tool. While security is a whole other issue, the tool itself is pretty cool. It claims to have saved 45 minutes of cumulative download times.

    I’m going to give the firefox piping a try as well.

    –Chris

  • http://tatler.typepad.com/nose/2005/06/firefox_hack_an.html The NOSE: Alfred Essa’s Weblog

    Firefox Hack and HTTP Pipelining

    Here’s a great hack (via Feld Thoughts and Subterrrain.net) to make Firefox download pages faster for broadband users. Browser requests are normally processed sequentially by the web server. HTTP pipelining allows multiple requests to be processed toge…

  • http://siliconverse.blogspot.com Ruchit

    Thats cool, I find firefox to be bit heavyweight application consuming lot of memory. I think this tweaking will result in better user experience.

    Wondering if there are any drawback of doing this tweaking, otherwise firefox team might have this done it their default settings…anu idea?

  • http://weblog.juima.org Sander

    Note that several web- and proxy servers still break horribly if you try to use pipelining. If you suddenly start seeing websites render badly, that’s why. (This is also the reason this preference hasn’t been enabled by default.)

    Setting maxrequests high is also a bad idea, as just a couple of people having done that and visiting at the same time can very swiftly bring a small webserver (which often have a limit like 100 concurrent requests) to its knees.

    And finally paint delay set to 0 will actually make the total rendering time take longer, as there’s much more reflowing happening. Basically with this pref set, painting starts right at the moment that the first bits of data come in, so everything _seems_ snappier (especially on a really fast connection), but the cost is content moving all over the screen…

    Don’t just take my word from it either, someone like Asa Dotzler says the same: http://weblogs.mozillazine.org/asa/archives/007164.html

  • http://weblog.juima.org Sander

    Oh, and you might find this useful:

    Set browser.sessionhistory.max_viewers to larger than zero, to get blazingly fast back and forward (like Opera) has in the upcoming Firefox 1.1 – albeit at the cost of memory usage. (Already available in the deer park preview.)
    Still has bugs (think of restoring changes to the DOM due to scripting), so not yet enabled by default.

  • http://www.brode.net David Brode

    I use gmail and found that this tweak improves performance noticably. That alone is worth it. Thanks, Brad!

  • http://www.subterrain.net/ Justin Lundy

    I’ve requested that these pipelining speed ups be included in future firefox releases as default settings.

  • http://isotop.dotgeek.org/?p=4 isoTop`s blog

    Feld Thoughts: Speed Up Firefox with Pipelining

    I came accross this tweak for FireFox and multipiping its seems to making some sites faster but didn’t check how fast it making it.
    Feld Thoughts: Speed Up Firefox with Pipelining

  • Norman Fenton

    How can I get rid of:
    ad.yieldmanager.com

Build something great with me