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Hi, I’m Brad Feld, a managing director at the Foundry Group who lives in Boulder, Colorado. I invest in software and Internet companies around the US, run marathons and read a lot.

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Making Email Connections at an Early Age

Comments (11)

I spend plenty of time making connections between people.  Email has certainly made this a lot easier.  One of my best friends – Warren Katz (the founder / CEO of Mak Technologies) recently send me some prehistoric emails that he had saved from me demonstrating that even when I was in my mid 20′s, I was using email to connect people.  Note the Compuserve email address – can you remember your Compuserve (or Source) address?  And yes – the Compuserve address bounces now.

Subject: Scott Instruments
Date: 10 Sep 92 17:38:38 EDT
From: Bradley Feld <
75170.1206@CompuServe.COM>
To: Warren Katz

Warren,

I sent a letter to a company in Denton, TX called Scott Instruments and suggested they give you a call. This is a company that was co-founded by my first "business mentor" — a guy named Gene Scott. They are a voice recognition company that is based on technology developed by Gene’s son Brian (Brian is VP of R&D). They are a small company (20 or so people) that are primarily in the technology development and licensing business. They have deals with a number of companies, including Silicon Graphics.

I met with them last week when I was in Dallas. Their current CEO is a guy named Marvin Preston who also has his own business working with developing technology companies (Scott Instruments is his current client). He’s a super neat guy, and lives in Princeton, NJ (and has a daughter at MIT). I thought you might benefit by being hooked up with these guys in some way. When I mentioned virtual reality, everyone’s eyes lit up. I’ll send over a copy of their marketing stuff for you.

… Bradley

  • http://disruptivethoughts.com Fraser

    1992 virtual reality! nice :)

  • proales

    There was a Newsweek cover article a few weeks ago “When Barry became Barack”.. so tell us the story of when “Bradley became Brad”

    • http://www.feld.com Brad Feld

      The only people that ever called me Bradley were my mom and my wife Amy (and only when they were angry at me.) For some reason I used “Bradley” or “Bradley A. Feld” as my formal signature for a long time – I guess it was because of my dad’s Stanley / Stan dichotomy. A few years ago I decided this was a waste of three letters so I’m now just Brad.

  • http://davidduey.typepad.com David Duey

    I have fond memories of CompuServe, but I can't remember my Compuserve email address.

    • Steve Zweig

      Ha! I sent my first real email in 1978 through the Arpanet (to MIT, complaining about the lack of a save game feature in Zork), and I remember my first Compuserve email address (from 1984). Back in my day, we had to hand crank the computers…

  • X

    Yet when young people, such as myself, email you, you don't reply.

    • David

      What a smart way to get on someone's good side. Even people with good intentions and sincere efforts sometimes let them slip by……answering emails from random people is a blessing, not an expectation.

  • Dan Burcaw

    It is all fun and games until emails from 16 years get published– a fun email but a real reminder that email is permanent. :-)

  • Nancy C

    Looks like this has been a talent in the making for quite some time. :-)
    Appreciate you taking the time to continue this as life has certainly gotten busier for you.

  • http://www.marypurslow.com/ mary

    this is sad but was born only a few years for this e-mail was written. I am spoiled by the ease of todays technology and did not have to work so hard for email I guess you could say. But this is interesting to get a feel for how it used to be and how in 92' you were doing this…very impressive!

  • Chip Schooler

    Ah, I remember working at UNH in 1978 when one of the system programmers came back from DECUS with a “freeware” application some user had written and contributed. (And everyone thinks open source is a new idea). The system programmer thought it was useless but installed anyway on the university's administrative DECsystem-10. The app's name? email.

    It took the staff exacly one day to find a use for it – sending messages from overnight production batch runs. You could log in in the morning and know whether your batch run was sucessful (or where it had failed). It took about three days for people to start actually sending messages to one another. And the rest…as you see from above, is history.

  • Chip Schooler

    Ah, I remember working at UNH in 1978 when one of the system programmers came back from DECUS with a "freeware" application some user had written and contributed. (And everyone thinks open source is a new idea). The system programmer thought it was useless but installed anyway on the university's administrative DECsystem-10. The app's name? email.

    It took the staff exacly one day to find a use for it – sending messages from overnight production batch runs. You could log in in the morning and know whether your batch run was sucessful (or where it had failed). It took about three days for people to start actually sending messages to one another. And the rest…as you see from above, is history.

  • proales

    There was a Newsweek cover article a few weeks ago "When Barry became Barack".. so tell us the story of when "Bradley became Brad"

  • X

    Yet when young people, such as myself, email you, you don't reply.

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/david_duey david_duey

    I have fond memories of CompuServe, but I can't remember my Compuserve email address.

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/bfeld bfeld

    The only people that ever called me Bradley were my mom and my wife Amy (and only when they were angry at me.) For some reason I used “Bradley” or “Bradley A. Feld” as my formal signature for a long time – I guess it was because of my dad’s Stanley / Stan dichotomy. A few years ago I decided this was a waste of three letters so I’m now just Brad.

  • Fraser

    1992 virtual reality! nice :)

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/dan_burcaw6513 dan_burcaw6513

    It is all fun and games until emails from 16 years get published– a fun email but a real reminder that email is permanent. :-)

  • Nancy C

    Looks like this has been a talent in the making for quite some time. :-)
    Appreciate you taking the time to continue this as life has certainly gotten busier for you.

  • mary

    this is sad but was born only a few years for this e-mail was written. I am spoiled by the ease of todays technology and did not have to work so hard for email I guess you could say. But this is interesting to get a feel for how it used to be and how in 92' you were doing this…very impressive!

  • Steve Zweig

    Ha! I sent my first real email in 1978 through the Arpanet (to MIT, complaining about the lack of a save game feature in Zork), and I remember my first Compuserve email address (from 1984). Back in my day, we had to hand crank the computers…

  • David

    What a smart way to get on someone's good side. Even people with good intentions and sincere efforts sometimes let them slip by……answering emails from random people is a blessing, not an expectation.

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