I Love Email

Email.  Email.  Email.

My partner Chris Wand just put up a post titled Did Darwin Skip Over Email?  Every now and then the "Email is dead" meme makes the rounds and lights up TechMeme.  The right answer isn’t that "email is dead"; it’s that new and exciting stuff is happening around the use of "messaging" and it’s time for some new innovation.

For those of you who suggest that I switch all my email over to Facebook, I say to you "Laugh-a-while you can, Monkey Boy."

If I had to do all my "messaging" in Facebook, that’s what would happen to me. And since Lithium is no longer on credit, I doubt I’d be very pleasant to deal with.  Rather than facing this reality, help us help out by bringing us your new email (ahem – or messaging if you want to be politically correct) innovations.

  • Boy did I love that movie! (God knows why) Thanks for posting the short trip down memory lane.

    Oh, and good point too. Email is very useful/valuable/powerful, all of which qualities are perfectly balanced by its problems and limitations.

  • brad,
    i left this comment on seth levine's blog this morning
    ——
    to each his/her own these days. my kids use facebook and text messaging for the most part but now that they have email on their phones (bberry and iphone) they use that as well, but it's not their primary messaging system.

    i still use email as my primary method, but as someone else said, it's the new snail mail. i hate doing it and its a chore. i called it “homework” on twitter today. that's how i feel about it.

    i find text messaging and twitter are best for me, but they will only be better for a while. they will get more noisy and i'll have to move to something else.

    i don't use facebook messaging at all. when people send me facebook messages, they are talking to a black hole

    • You just described the opportunity nicely!

    • fred, i think the real solutions here are totally independent of communications medium. facebook/twitter/texting/email – it's all messaging and is all going to be subject to similar sets of problems. the right solutions around managing those channels and the data that passes across them won't care about the distinctions between them. as a side note, i really do think a lot of things pointed to as generational differences are often largely due to the difference of having a job or not. socially, there's tons of synchronous communication where the data is very transitory in nature. in a work setting, those discussions are far more often asynchronous in nature, and it's often important to have future access to that information as well as the context of discussions, not to mention audit trails and compliance/policy issues. i don't see email being supplanted for all of that type of communication anytime soon.

  • i might have a thought or two on this…. http://www.emaildashboard.com/2008/04/three-next-

  • Ok, I'll have to weigh in on this too. Anonymous systems are, and always will be, rife with noise, spam, and scams. Time for something that's security and identity based…
    (Insert shameless plug for Sendside here.)

  • brad,
    i left this comment on seth levine's blog this morning
    ——
    to each his/her own these days. my kids use facebook and text messaging for the most part but now that they have email on their phones (bberry and iphone) they use that as well, but it's not their primary messaging system.

    i still use email as my primary method, but as someone else said, it's the new snail mail. i hate doing it and its a chore. i called it "homework" on twitter today. that's how i feel about it.

    i find text messaging and twitter are best for me, but they will only be better for a while. they will get more noisy and i'll have to move to something else.

    i don't use facebook messaging at all. when people send me facebook messages, they are talking to a black hole

  • i might have a thought or two on this…. http://www.emaildashboard.com/2008/04/three-next-

  • You just described the opportunity nicely!

  • fred, i think the real solutions here are totally independent of communications medium. facebook/twitter/texting/email – it's all messaging and is all going to be subject to similar sets of problems. the right solutions around managing those channels and the data that passes across them won't care about the distinctions between them. as a side note, i really do think a lot of things pointed to as generational differences are often largely due to the difference of having a job or not. socially, there's tons of synchronous communication where the data is very transitory in nature. in a work setting, those discussions are far more often asynchronous in nature, and it's often important to have future access to that information as well as the context of discussions, not to mention audit trails and compliance/policy issues. i don't see email being supplanted for all of that type of communication anytime soon.

  • Boy did I love that movie! (God knows why) Thanks for posting the short trip down memory lane.

    Oh, and good point too. Email is very useful/valuable/powerful, all of which qualities are perfectly balanced by its problems and limitations.

  • Jeff Barson, Evangel

    Ok, I'll have to weigh in on this too. Anonymous systems are, and always will be, rife with noise, spam, and scams. Time for something that's security and identity based…
    (Insert shameless plug for Sendside here.)

  • Long live email! In fact, I just started a blog dedicated to teaching people how to love email: http://love2email.blogspot.com/