Glue Me Back Together

Loic Le Meur totally nailed why glue matters in his post My social map is totally decentralized but I want it back on my blog.  Following is the defining image from Loic’s notebook.

image

I’m not sure the answer (I want it back on my blog) is correct, but we are in the middle of yet another massive decentralization of data – this time very personal.  Loic’s identity and content is spread all over the web (as is mine.)  He wants it back in one place – one that belongs to him.

If we only had 10 web services participating in this grand decentralization of Loic, it would be no big deal.  But there are now thousands – all which want to be able to play with all the others.  With each new unit of data, and each new service, it gets a little messier (and a little more fun.)

  • Testing a cool new feature of Intense Debate that is coming soon to a commenting system near you (me.)

  • Testing a cool new feature of Intense Debate that is coming soon to a commenting system near you (me.)

  • jon

    Unfortunately you don't get notifications for your own comments. So hopefully this one will help.

  • jon

    Unfortunately you don't get notifications for your own comments. So hopefully this one will help.

  • Dan Burcaw

    A major problem with the way things are heading is information overload. The same thing that has made search so awful (compared to the early days when there were relatively few sites to crawl).

    The trouble is information overload causes fatigue. Fatigue limits participation. This screams for glue that gets ahead of the problem rather than amplifying it.

    • Your comment text = I totally agree. Using search today (vs. search ala 1999) as a proxy for the problem is good – I almost included an example of this in the post but then decided it made things to ponderous. Soon we’ll need PEO (personal engine optimization).

    • I totally agree. Using search today (vs. search ala 1999) as a proxy for the problem is good – I almost included an example of this in the post but then decided it made things to ponderous. Soon we’ll need PEO (personal engine optimization).

  • John Minnihan

    The concept (and implementation) of buckets is going to be *very* important. Managing the intersection of data (unique, overlap, duplicate) amongst buckets will be the secret sauce.

  • I just listened to an interview with Clay Shirky (http://tinyurl.com/3y72d5) where he identified a big gap between “famous” and not famous people- the difference being (online and off) the ability to respond symmetrically to every conversation directed to a person.

    Loic wants everything on his blog because he produces a lot of content, gets a lot of attention and can't respond equally to all of it- i.e. he'd rather respond in comments on his own blog than click through to other platforms, log in, comment, etc. He wants a magnet more than he wants glue.

    People with more symmetrical graphs may be happier using something else (eg Facebook)- or lots of places- as the hub(s) of their social graphs depending on how they respond to others as well as what they produce. A layer of glue would work better here.
    —-
    The glue metaphor is breaking down for me. I wonder if “synapses” is more accurate- not sticking things together permanently, but constantly forming and re-forming connections, getting stronger and smarter as it goes.

    . . . mmm, glue still has a better ring.

  • The concept (and implementation) of buckets is going to be *very* important. Managing the intersection of data (unique, overlap, duplicate) amongst buckets will be the secret sauce.

  • I totally agree. Using search today (vs. search ala 1999) as a proxy for the problem is good – I almost included an example of this in the post but then decided it made things to ponderous. Soon we’ll need PEO (personal engine optimization).

  • A major problem with the way things are heading is information overload. The same thing that has made search so awful (compared to the early days when there were relatively few sites to crawl).

    The trouble is information overload causes fatigue. Fatigue limits participation. This screams for glue that gets ahead of the problem rather than amplifying it.

    • Your comment text = I totally agree. Using search today (vs. search ala 1999) as a proxy for the problem is good – I almost included an example of this in the post but then decided it made things to ponderous. Soon we’ll need PEO (personal engine optimization).

  • I just listened to an interview with Clay Shirky (http://tinyurl.com/3y72d5) where he identified a big gap between "famous" and not famous people- the difference being (online and off) the ability to respond symmetrically to every conversation directed to a person.

    Loic wants everything on his blog because he produces a lot of content, gets a lot of attention and can't respond equally to all of it- i.e. he'd rather respond in comments on his own blog than click through to other platforms, log in, comment, etc. He wants a magnet more than he wants glue.

    People with more symmetrical graphs may be happier using something else (eg Facebook)- or lots of places- as the hub(s) of their social graphs depending on how they respond to others as well as what they produce. A layer of glue would work better here.
    —-
    The glue metaphor is breaking down for me. I wonder if "synapses" is more accurate- not sticking things together permanently, but constantly forming and re-forming connections, getting stronger and smarter as it goes.

    . . . mmm, glue still has a better ring.

  • It's a difficult thing to listen to feedback from your initial users, the first 25,000, and do the opposite of what they recommend. You alienate your "support base" etc etc. Tough situation.

  • I think, this might be one of their limited color pictures
    do you know panda's dream